Test your Reading Skills #03

Test your Reading Skills #03

Reading comprehension

Read the following passage carefully before answering the questions. This exercise aimed at enhancing your reading and comprehending skills.

I had come to Bangalore, India’s Silicon Valley, on my own Columbus-like journey of exploration. Columbus sailed with the Nina, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria in an effort to discover a shorter, more direct route to India by heading west, across the Atlantic, on what he presumed to be an open sea route to the East Indies. India and the magical Spice Islands of the East were famed at the time for their gold, pearls, gems, and silk—a source of untold riches. When Columbus set sail, he apparently assumed the earth was round, which was why he was convinced that he could get to India by going west. He miscalculated the distance, though. He thought the earth was a smaller sphere than it is. He also did not anticipate running into a landmass before he reached the East Indies. Nevertheless, he called the aboriginal peoples he encountered in the new world “Indians.” Returning home, though, Columbus was able to tell his patrons, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, that although he never did find India, he could confirm that the world was indeed round. I set out for India by going due east, via Frankfurt. I had Lufthansa business class. I knew exactly which direction I was going thanks to the GPS map displayed on the screen that popped out of the armrest of my airline seat. I landed safely and on schedule. I too encountered people called Indians. I too was searching for India’s riches. Columbus was searching for hardware—precious metals, silk, and spice—the sources of wealth in his day. I was searching for software, brainpower, complex algorithms, knowledge workers, call centres, transmission protocols, breakthroughs in optical engineering—the sources of wealth in our day. Columbus was happy to make the Indians he met his slaves, a pool of free manual labour. I just wanted to understand why the Indians I met were taking our work, why they had become such an important pool for the outsourcing of service and information technology work from America and other industrialized countries. Columbus had more than one hundred men on his three ships; I had a small crew from the Discovery Times channel that fit comfortably into two banged-up vans, with Indian drivers who drove barefoot. When I set sail, so to speak, I too assumed that the world was round, but what I encountered in the real India profoundly shook my faith in that notion. Columbus accidentally ran into America but thought he had discovered part of India. I actually found India and thought many of the people I met there were Americans. Some had actually taken American names, and others were doing great imitations of American accents at call centres and American business techniques at software labs. Columbus reported to his king and queen that the world was round, and he went down in history as the man who first made this discovery. I returned home and shared my discovery only with my wife, and only in a whisper. “Honey,” I confided, “I think the world is flat.”

Source: This article is from The World is Flat by Thomas L. Friedman

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=12779679

 

 

Q.1 which of the following words best expresses writer’s style of writing?

 

(a) Critical       (b) Analogical              (c) Analytical               (d) factual

 

Q.2 what is the most suitable title of the passage?

 

(a) Understanding Bangalore, India’s Silicon Valley

(b) India –Land of riches

(c) Exploration – Then and Now

(d) Comparative study – Indian IT Industry

Q.3 which of the following belief of the Author was shaken profoundly?

 

(a) The World is round

(b) Indians are hardworking people

(c) The aboriginal peoples of America are known as “Indians.”

(d) Columbus was searching for India’s riches

 

  1. 4 which of the following sentences is correct as per the passage?

 

(a) Neither Columbus nor author could find their destination

(b) Columbus sailed in an effort to discover a shorter, more direct route to India by heading west, across the Pacific Ocean.

(c) Columbus reported to his king and queen that the world was flat, and he went down in history as the man who discovered new route to India.

(d) Author believed earth was not round but flat.

 

RC 3 Answers and Solutions

 

Q.1 (b) Author compares (provides analogy) with that of Columbus.

Q.2 (a) other options covers only tiny part of the passage

Q.3 (a) when I set sail, so to speak, I too assumed that the world was round, but what I encountered in the real India profoundly shook my faith in that notion.

Q.4 (d) other options are factually incorrect.

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